David Snider

2016 Speaker Proposal: The Platform Business: How Cloud Foundry Facilitates Cloud Native Transformation by David Gardner

Presenter:

David Gardner, Product Owner for AppFog

Abstract:

In this presentation, David will examine the characteristics of the cloud native businesses that disrupting incumbent businesses, transforming our economy, and reshaping our communications, marketing and transactions. He will share ideas businesses can use to adopt and create their own a culture of innovation. The presentation will examine why Platform-as-a-Service is relevant to any company that creates consumer experiences, and how an “opinionated architecture” like Cloud Foundry can contribute to business transformation. He will also showcase examples of how Cloud Foundry facilitates cloud native application lifecycle management.

For attendees interested in digging deeper into Cloud Foundry and experiencing platform-driven, cloud native deployment, David will be conducting a 1-hour workshop 2 weeks after this presentation on common workloads and deployment patterns. Attendees will receive a promo code for a Free AppFog Trial account.


Bio:

DavidGardnerDavid Gardner is the Product Owner for AppFog, CenturyLink’s Platform-as-a-Service powered by Cloud Foundry. He has a BS in Computer Science from BYU, and an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. Before CenturyLink, he worked in Product at Adobe, Webtrends, and Endurance International Group. In addition, as an Accenture Consultant, he helped build web solutions for Technology and Financial Services clients. He enjoys helping companies embrace the future and modern development methods.


2016 Ignite Proposal: An ElasticSearch Cluster Named George Armstrong Custer

Abstract:

This is the epic tale of an elasticsearch cluster named “Custer”, named after the US Calvary Commander.

It didn’t start out with a name, it started out as our logstash cluster, but after experiencing how easy it was to search and find logs using logstash, our developers took it upon themselves to see what else it could be used for. This was our Battle of Little Big Horn.

In this ignite talk, attendees will laugh and learn as I explain:

  • the origin of our cluster
  • how it got it’s name
  • Where things went wrong
  • Steps we took (good and bad) to deal with daily crashes (a.k.a. Little Big Horn)
  • Lessons learned on using and scaling elasticsearch

Attendees will leave this short, 5 minute talk with the ability to identify the signs and symptoms of an over-utilized cluster. Specific thresholds that proved invaluable to us, such as JVM heap usage, memory utilization, shard movement, and index latency will be shared. They will also learn the tips and tactics on how to recover once a problem cluster is identified.


 

will_buttonWill Button is a DevOps Advocate for Trax Technologies. He works closely with Development and Operational teams to align resources and strategies, focusing on communication. When not at Trax, he can be found authoring lessons for Egghead.io and Pluralsight as well as speaking at tech events. In his free time he enjoys coaching at CultFit Four Peaks. I mean CrossFit Four Peaks.

 


2016 Speaker Proposal: Fear and Loathing in Systems Administration

Description:

DevOps doesn’t matter.  I will talk about ways that Systems / Operations teams can have a better quality of life, while providing better service, and developing better relationships with their companies, all while invoking the “D” word a minimum of times.

Abstract:

“DevOps Doesn’t Work.”  Whether it’s from people who’s “DevOps Transformation” consisted of a renaming, or people who scoffed at the idea of letting development deploy to Prod more often, I hear this all the time.  And frankly, I’m tired of “What is DevOps” talks.

DevOps is a strawmanperson.  When a SysAdmin says “DevOps doesn’t work” or grumbles about giving access to Production to people, the real problem is that historically they have been outnumbered, overridden, and have not had authority aligned with responsibility.

In this talk, I will demonstrate why DevOps doesn’t matter, and that focusing on DevOps is missing the point.  I will offer practical solutions to:

  • the problems of historically poor relations with other teams
  • All of the responsiblity, none of the authority
  • Tragically slim Systems / Ops teams
  • Constant Firefighting

velocity_nyc_2014-headshotWaldo is a Geek, Problem Solver, Systems/Operations Engineer, and DevOps Enthusiast.  He tries to use his Viking Privilege superpowers for good, but is a flawed human being.  He aspires to be a better bio writer one day.


2016 Speaker Proposal: Misconceptions of Automation

Description:

Do you remember that time the janky script you banged out was discovered to be the lynchpin of Production? Have you ever faced an “Automate ALL-THE-THINGS” project? Has your management ever-so-helpfully suggested that you “just automate it”? In this talk, I’ll discuss the mental gap that exists between automation and other business software.

Abstract:

Automation, the panacea of tech. It is necessary to work effectively. It’s needed in order to ensure consistency, prevent mistakes, and free engineers up to do more interesting work.

Infrastructure and delivery code is – at it’s best – invisible. But when it fails, the janky thing that you whipped up to solve a problem so you could move on with life is discovered to be in the critical path of Production.

You should absolutely automate everything that you can, but there are a many assumptions that go into automation, particularly by those who aren’t doing the automation work themselves. More important than writing automation is setting expectations. In this talk, I’ll cover

  • No, automation won’t put your job at risk
  • Setting Expectations
  • Where to start
  • How to deal with an “Automation Project”
  • Sane approaches to “Automate ALL-THE-THINGS”
  • Dealing with unintended consequences
  • Recognizing the perception difference between product software “bugs” versus “incidents” created by automation
  • Entropy and you
  • Why Testing isn’t just the QA Team
  • Rise of the Machines

velocity_nyc_2014-headshotWaldo is a Geek, Problem Solver, Systems/Operations Engineer, and DevOps Enthusiast.  He tries to use his Viking Privilege superpowers for good, but is a flawed human being.  He aspires to be a better bio writer one day.


2016 Speaker Proposal: Tyranny of the Minimum Viable Product (MVP)

Description:

We, as an industry, do ourselves a disservice by claiming that a product is ‘MVP’, short for “Minimum Viable Product”.  Instead of labelling them a “Proof of Concept” or “Experiment”, many such projects fail at the tests of being “Viable” or “Product”.  Let’s be more humane to our peers and customers by labelling “Experiments” as such, and ensuring that Products are minimally Production-ready.

Abstract:

While continuously iterating on a product is absolutely important to ensure that you’re working on products that people want, calling them “MVP” does not give an excuse for not making them Operable.  There are terms for projects that are not Viable Products; Let us encourage the use of “Experiments” or “Proof of Concept” for such things that we want to run, but are unwilling to apply Production-ready rigor to, so as to set more reasonable expectations of support levels.
In this talk, I will discuss the points that make a Product “Minimally Viable”, such as:

  • Automatically Deployable
  • Config-managed, where applicable
  • Basically Monitorable (app health checks), including Pager decisions.
  • Shipping Metrics
  • Shipping Logs
  • Scalable
  • Reasonably Documented

velocity_nyc_2014-headshotWaldo is a Geek, Problem Solver, Systems/Operations Engineer, and DevOps Enthusiast.  He tries to use his Viking Privilege superpowers for good, but is a flawed human being.  He aspires to be a better bio writer one day.


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